linkys!

Makes me wanna holler! 

There have been so many good (and disturbing) articles about climate change in the last few days that I am going to list a few, even though Hapless Press is really about (my) art and what inspires it. There’s so much information out there that it can be overwhelming; here are a few pieces I got something out of:

Are my hamburgers hurting the planet?

Some answers from The Washington Post concerning the debate about how much hamburgers affect the environment. By Sarah Kaplan

This New York Times story follows some of the plastic we “recycle” to an area of Indonesia where it is burned to fuel the making of tofu. This is a profoundly disturbing account of the cost of our convenience. By

The Most Detailed Map of Auto Emissions in America

This NYTimes article features an interactive map that will show you the level of vehicle emissions, from cars and freight, in metro areas across the US…it’s stunning. Not in a good way. For example, Oklahoma City emissions have risen 57% since 1990. Not good. By Nadja Popovich and

Cities Worldwide Are Reimagining Their Relationship With Cars

As Hapless Press demonstrates, I’m a fan of mass transit and this NYTimes article looks at some of the ways cities are trying to cut down on auto emissions, which account for almost a quarter of all green house gases (according to the article…). By Somini Sengupta and      

America Recycles Day Encouraged Recycling. It Was Sponsored by Companies That Produce a Ton of Plastic.

This is pretty dispiriting–another article, this one from Mother Jones Magazine, about some of the true costs of our convenience. According to this article, 91% of plastics are never recycled. We try and we mean well, but it’s not working. Clearly, we have to change our behaviors. By Emily Holden and Oliver Milman

But look! There’s progress! We can change things for the better:

Amtrak Could Turn A Profit In 2020 For The 1st Time Ever

This segment from the radio show/streaming show Here and Now tells us that our country’s train service is doing better! Train travel is going to be part of the answer for our future and it’s crucial to know about the changes so we can support them–and demand MORE!! By Jeremy Hobson and Allison Hagan

We have to do it–and we can do it!

 

 

 

Jalopy, a self-portrait

This is the unfinished final project from my first semester at woodworking school; the assignment was to make a box of some sort with hinges. My classmates made large boxes for storage–some of them turned out beautifully–but I had run out of wood so I made a series of boxes with various elements (different angles, finishes, cuts, hinges, etc…) to try to cover the things we’d learned over the semester using the scraps I still had and pieces I could scrounge from the trash bins.

I really did learn some new things doing this piece, which was a bit too ‘arty’ for the class, frankly. A picture of it, still unfinished, with the roof (beautiful wood!) is below. I really should finish it and take a few pix before I disassemble it and put lids on the boxes for actual use. (I don’t think the instructor understood my approach, but, whatevs…I got a lot of practice in, which was the point, I thought.)  

House structure made of stack of handmade and finished wooden boxes
Jalopy, a self-portrait from later middle-age. Various techniques and materials.

the new old me

10/29/19 Hey! I just heard a bit of a story on Marketplace.org about the intersection of ageism & sexism in the workplace and recommend the podcast:  A double whammy for older women in the workplace

Here’s work from a book I’ve done recently about aging and the language people are starting to use towards and around me, cuz they’re not seeing me, lots. When someone does notice me, it is not in response to the persona I strive to project into the world, but rather, it is as a thing apart, “an old.” I do not recognize this “other,” this irrelevant shell. I keep looking for what so many others see: my new old identity.

 

Mass Transit is part of our answer

10/10/19  This is an incredibly interesting/horrifying article in the New York Times:

The Most Detailed Map of Auto Emissions in America

by Nadja Popovich and

This map shows you the levels in growth of total emissions and per person since 1990  in various urban areas around the US. It’s awful. But not hopeless! Look around your community for answers and get on board!

bus! copy

In celebration of the new fixed route transit system that started in my town this Monday, I am posting a link to a re-broadcast of a really wonderful radio program about mass transit: On the Media‘s show, “Whose Streets?”

Naturally cool!

Naturally cool paddle fans

More paddle fans, while it’s still hot!  I’m making these for a new local “Climate Action Coalition.” There’s going to be another layer, of leaf veins and the name of the group and then, I’ll fold them over and glue them with the handle. These are for an event in a few weeks. This tulip poplar leaf block is from a project I never quite finished a few years ago, but it’s perfect for this application–the group is promoting the health of the mountains where I’m living right now and tulip poplars are abundant here, and their leaves are truly unique and aesthetically interesting. I think they’re a good motif for the cause and provide a lot of graphic possibilities. Also, I think it’s a great poster, as is! ha!

Here’s the layer of leaf veins–I think it’ll look cute when it’s folded over and the stick handle suggests a larger vein. I still have to fit the org’s name on here.

print to fabric

These are samples of designs I had printed to fabric last year, both created from prints I did. The one on the left was based on a monotype and the one on the right was based on a reduction cut letterpress print. (I used the blue fabric to cover chair cushions on my chair project last year; I called it “Shop Class.”) I photographed the prints for digital files and then used the fabric printing service, “Spoonflower” to print out yardage. The images above are what the samples looked like when I ordered. (I really like the results, but because I could afford to only get a yard of each, I haven’t found anything to do with the fabric, beyond the cushion cover.)