linkys!

Makes me wanna holler! 

There have been so many good (and disturbing) articles about climate change in the last few days that I am going to list a few, even though Hapless Press is really about (my) art and what inspires it. There’s so much information out there that it can be overwhelming; here are a few pieces I got something out of:

Are my hamburgers hurting the planet?

Some answers from The Washington Post concerning the debate about how much hamburgers affect the environment. By Sarah Kaplan

This New York Times story follows some of the plastic we “recycle” to an area of Indonesia where it is burned to fuel the making of tofu. This is a profoundly disturbing account of the cost of our convenience. By

The Most Detailed Map of Auto Emissions in America

This NYTimes article features an interactive map that will show you the level of vehicle emissions, from cars and freight, in metro areas across the US…it’s stunning. Not in a good way. For example, Oklahoma City emissions have risen 57% since 1990. Not good. By Nadja Popovich and

Cities Worldwide Are Reimagining Their Relationship With Cars

As Hapless Press demonstrates, I’m a fan of mass transit and this NYTimes article looks at some of the ways cities are trying to cut down on auto emissions, which account for almost a quarter of all green house gases (according to the article…). By Somini Sengupta and      

America Recycles Day Encouraged Recycling. It Was Sponsored by Companies That Produce a Ton of Plastic.

This is pretty dispiriting–another article, this one from Mother Jones Magazine, about some of the true costs of our convenience. According to this article, 91% of plastics are never recycled. We try and we mean well, but it’s not working. Clearly, we have to change our behaviors. By Emily Holden and Oliver Milman

But look! There’s progress! We can change things for the better:

Amtrak Could Turn A Profit In 2020 For The 1st Time Ever

This segment from the radio show/streaming show Here and Now tells us that our country’s train service is doing better! Train travel is going to be part of the answer for our future and it’s crucial to know about the changes so we can support them–and demand MORE!! By Jeremy Hobson and Allison Hagan

We have to do it–and we can do it!

 

 

 

Mass Transit is part of our answer

10/10/19  This is an incredibly interesting/horrifying article in the New York Times:

The Most Detailed Map of Auto Emissions in America

by Nadja Popovich and

This map shows you the levels in growth of total emissions and per person since 1990  in various urban areas around the US. It’s awful. But not hopeless! Look around your community for answers and get on board!

bus! copy

In celebration of the new fixed route transit system that started in my town this Monday, I am posting a link to a re-broadcast of a really wonderful radio program about mass transit: On the Media‘s show, “Whose Streets?”

Naturally cool!

Naturally cool paddle fans

More paddle fans, while it’s still hot!  I’m making these for a new local “Climate Action Coalition.” There’s going to be another layer, of leaf veins and the name of the group and then, I’ll fold them over and glue them with the handle. These are for an event in a few weeks. This tulip poplar leaf block is from a project I never quite finished a few years ago, but it’s perfect for this application–the group is promoting the health of the mountains where I’m living right now and tulip poplars are abundant here, and their leaves are truly unique and aesthetically interesting. I think they’re a good motif for the cause and provide a lot of graphic possibilities. Also, I think it’s a great poster, as is! ha!

Here’s the layer of leaf veins–I think it’ll look cute when it’s folded over and the stick handle suggests a larger vein. I still have to fit the org’s name on here.

paddle-fan-a-rama, etc

Hey, here are some things I worked on recently and had some fun with–the paddle fans are to promote bus riding and the poster is a second draft; I plan to amp up its bold color and make the text a little more readable.

 

Green it up!

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Here’s some more stuff for paddle fans–this one promotes environmentalism, environmental awareness and climate change awareness. I’m planning on adding another layer of leaves to the foliage and trimming the sheet like the brown one in the upper left. The wooden stick will be the ‘trunk.’ Several of the typefaces I have to choose from are pretty beaten up, but I think that’s okay…it fits in with this message pretty well.

(Also, maybe I should add: the paper is cast offs from a local print shop, most of the sticks are re-used and the ink is hella old…I’m trying to make the most use of materials on hand…)

 

Pyramid of Power/We Got the Power!

I spent a bunch of time in the printshop yesterday (yay!) and finished up the printing on my next set of paddle fans, “Pyramid of Power.” I made them with cutoffs from the local university’s print shop; the shop is always happy to give stuff away rather than to pulp it. This coated card stock works great for fanning and picked up the ink pretty well. Clearly, the type I have access to is pretty beat up, but it’s working well for my intent. I’m now looking for some American flag stickers to put in the lower right hand corner to fill that empty space. These are for the Fourth of July, but are also for every day that citizens need encouragement to believe that we have what it takes to make the nation of our ideals.

Peace in the US and everywhere.

museums as problematic

IMG_7003I often listen to podcasts while doing rote or simple tasks and this morning, while carving on a linoleum block, I listened to one of my favorites, CounterSpin from Fairness and Accountability in Reporting, or FAIR, @ https://fair.org/counterspin-radio/. The program interviews  a lot of sources that do not commonly get approached by corporate media reporters and talks about how corporate media often under- or mis- represent very important issues, policy or cultural trends to the detriment of citizens. The show I listened to today was an interview with Amin Husain, an organizer with the cultural activism group Decolonize This Place. The show’s host and interviewer, Janine Jackson, asks us to consider, “Cultural institutions are important sites of public conversation, but the public doesn’t have much say in who gets to lead that conversation, or the stories they tell. Activists are asking us to talk about what that means, and what it would mean to change it.” Her interview with Amin Husain discusses a lot of good points about colonization, ethnocentrism, wealth and equality. And it poses really important questions about the value of art, as culture, as manifest spirituality and as something that we assign monetary worth. It’s a really good listen, even if you’re not particularly interested in art and museums.

10/13/19   Here’s another interesting radio show about the role of museums in history and art: Fred Wilson Uses the Museum as His Palette on PRI.org

From the interview page: A New York-born conceptual artist and MacArthur “genius” grant recipient, Wilson has spent a lot of his career examining the way art and artifacts are chosen and exhibited. He wants everybody — the curators and the visitors — to reconsider how and why artwork makes its way into museums.

 

My day’s results

This is the stuff going on in my scene: Here are the paddle fans I’m almost done with; this is what they’ll look like, mostly (I’m still figuring out the heart–a lino stamp, or a block on the letterpress, or maybe a cutout heart of other paper? hmm…). I’m pretty tickled so far, gotta say.

The two prints are from some letterpress practice as mentioned below. The purple one will be a book cover, I think. The blue and mustardy one I think can stand alone–I really like the accretion of ink and textures there and will pursue that effect some this summer.

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The little flower picture shows what I was treated to when I opened up the kitchen door this morning–Huzzah! The first poppy on that side of the house. Lovely!