I resolve to finish these…some day…

 

in process
unfinished experimental prints

These are from a small collection of experiments that I’ve had draped around my studio/living room for a couple of years now. I vow to continue work on them this month, at least; I can’t quite bring myself to make a resolution to finish. ha. I really like the direction they’re going, but I can ruin them with the wrong next move. That’s probably kept me from resolving the design these last couple of years. Okay, so what–it’s just art, I’ll beast it and whatever the result, I’ll have learned something. Rock on, 2020!!! 

something bright for the new year!

IMG_3915

To celebrate the new start presented by the new year, I indulged a whim and bought a big bag of Meyer lemons–a rare treat! I took half of them to try something new: preserved lemons. I halved a recipe from the New York Times, but the recipe seems fairly standard. I may have put in too much salt, but as with so many things, time will tell…

Happy New Year !

participate!

IMG_3704There is a wonderful interview,  by David Marchese, with Frances Moore Lappé in the The New York Times that is informative, thought-provoking and shares with us just the kind of attitude that we need to make the (human) world a better and more livable place. Her work is part of what prompted me to become vegetarian decades ago and her ideas of effective political action on the individual level inspire me. Rock on, Citizen Moore Lappé!

“Participating in democracy is the essence of a good life.”   

–Moore Lappé

 

bookmaking

books 2019

finished!

It’s the craft sale time of year again and I’m slowly doing my part: I’ve dug up some cover material I’d cut years ago, when I had access to some serious cutting tools, and pulled out some misprints that I think look good, despite their imperfections, and I’m putting some blank books together. I’m planning on a few coptic-stitch books and maybe a stab binding or two. We’ll see.

linkys!

Makes me wanna holler! 

There have been so many good (and disturbing) articles about climate change in the last few days that I am going to list a few, even though Hapless Press is really about (my) art and what inspires it. There’s so much information out there that it can be overwhelming; here are a few pieces I got something out of:

Are my hamburgers hurting the planet?

Some answers from The Washington Post concerning the debate about how much hamburgers affect the environment. By Sarah Kaplan

This New York Times story follows some of the plastic we “recycle” to an area of Indonesia where it is burned to fuel the making of tofu. This is a profoundly disturbing account of the cost of our convenience. By

The Most Detailed Map of Auto Emissions in America

This NYTimes article features an interactive map that will show you the level of vehicle emissions, from cars and freight, in metro areas across the US…it’s stunning. Not in a good way. For example, Oklahoma City emissions have risen 57% since 1990. Not good. By Nadja Popovich and

Cities Worldwide Are Reimagining Their Relationship With Cars

As Hapless Press demonstrates, I’m a fan of mass transit and this NYTimes article looks at some of the ways cities are trying to cut down on auto emissions, which account for almost a quarter of all green house gases (according to the article…). By Somini Sengupta and      

America Recycles Day Encouraged Recycling. It Was Sponsored by Companies That Produce a Ton of Plastic.

This is pretty dispiriting–another article, this one from Mother Jones Magazine, about some of the true costs of our convenience. According to this article, 91% of plastics are never recycled. We try and we mean well, but it’s not working. Clearly, we have to change our behaviors. By Emily Holden and Oliver Milman

But look! There’s progress! We can change things for the better:

Amtrak Could Turn A Profit In 2020 For The 1st Time Ever

This segment from the radio show/streaming show Here and Now tells us that our country’s train service is doing better! Train travel is going to be part of the answer for our future and it’s crucial to know about the changes so we can support them–and demand MORE!! By Jeremy Hobson and Allison Hagan

We have to do it–and we can do it!

 

 

 

Jalopy, a self-portrait

 

This is the unfinished final project from my first semester at woodworking school; the assignment was to make a box of some sort with hinges. My classmates made large boxes for storage–some of them turned out beautifully–but I had run out of wood so I made a series of boxes with various elements (different angles, finishes, cuts, hinges, etc…) to try to cover the things we’d learned over the semester using the scraps I still had and pieces I could scrounge from the trash bins.

I really did learn some new things doing this piece, which was a bit too ‘arty’ for the class, frankly. A picture of it, still unfinished, with the roof (beautiful wood!) is below. I really should finish it and take a few pix before I disassemble it and put lids on the boxes for actual use. (I don’t think the instructor understood my approach, but, whatevs…I got a lot of practice in, which was the point, I thought.)  

House structure made of stack of handmade and finished wooden boxes
Jalopy, a self-portrait from later middle-age. Various techniques and materials.

the new old me

1/16/2020 Hey! There’s a good interview with Elinor Carucci on TheGuardian.com site about her photo work regarding late middle age. She and Ann Neumann discuss some of the (unsurprising) issues women encounter as they age and how her images examine her (rockin’!) aging body…I can totally relate to the picture of her lying in the snow–ha!–and to some of the other things she brings up, especially since I have had so much trouble getting people in the art world to even acknowledge how older women are marginalized.  A good read and some good art.

12/6/19  Hey! I just another article about ageism and sexism in the workplace: Washington Post article, “Administrative assistant jobs helped propel many women into the middle class. Now they’re disappearing” Yup, older women are effed in this culture and this economy.

10/29/19 Hey! I just heard a bit of a story on Marketplace.org about the intersection of ageism & sexism in the workplace and recommend the podcast:  A double whammy for older women in the workplace

Here’s work from a ‘foto album’ I’ve done recently about aging and the language people are starting to use towards and around me, cuz they’re not seeing me, lots. When someone does notice me, it is not in response to the persona I strive to project into the world, but rather, it is as a thing apart, “an old.” I do not recognize this “other,” this irrelevant shell. I keep looking for what so many others see: my new old identity.