Hey, Ladies

purses and a hammer

“Womanizer”    hammer, women’s purses   2013

This piece and incident, as described below, came to mind just yesterday as did an article from last spring, I think as a result of several things currently in the news: The WaPo’s Robin Givhan’s “Let’s talk about ‘Project Runway’ stars using ‘old lady’ to describe unflattering clothes” from April 23, 2019. Fashion, women who wear it and the men who get to decide…

This grad-school piece above was a ‘first draft’ attempt to express some degree of my lifelong rage at misogyny and the males who perpetuate it. When I presented it to my class, four young-ish men, the response was muted (these guys generally did not acknowledge the facts of sexism and they practically rejected the existence of ageism), but two of them did criticize my choice of purses. I had dug around in my own stuff and had rooted around a couple of thrift stores to find an array that suggested women of different ages, styles and incomes. These classmates told me with straight faces that the purses weren’t expensive or stylish enough, that they weren’t adequate; I could tell from their expressions that they were offended by the low-end items. In other words, these young men with limited experience in life and no experience as women, concluded my piece did not work because my materials were not expensive and designer-made, not because they did not communicate my intent. The instructor did not challenge my classmates; he pointed out a couple of confusing aspects of the piece, then hurried along, clearly not wishing to spend time talking about the world women exist in. It was a lost opportunity for all of us, I think.

So, this is what I was paying for, this is what ‘the academy’ allowed, rewarded and perpetuated. This was a few years ago; I look at today’s news and wonder how much has changed…

 

I resolve to finish these…some day…

 

in process
unfinished experimental prints

These are from a small collection of experiments that I’ve had draped around my studio/living room for a couple of years now. I vow to continue work on them this month, at least; I can’t quite bring myself to make a resolution to finish. ha. I really like the direction they’re going, but I can ruin them with the wrong next move. That’s probably kept me from resolving the design these last couple of years. Okay, so what–it’s just art, I’ll beast it and whatever the result, I’ll have learned something. Rock on, 2020!!! 

bookmaking

books 2019

finished!

It’s the craft sale time of year again and I’m slowly doing my part: I’ve dug up some cover material I’d cut years ago, when I had access to some serious cutting tools, and pulled out some misprints that I think look good, despite their imperfections, and I’m putting some blank books together. I’m planning on a few coptic-stitch books and maybe a stab binding or two. We’ll see.

Mass Transit is part of our answer

10/10/19  This is an incredibly interesting/horrifying article in the New York Times:

The Most Detailed Map of Auto Emissions in America

by Nadja Popovich and

This map shows you the levels in growth of total emissions and per person since 1990  in various urban areas around the US. It’s awful. But not hopeless! Look around your community for answers and get on board!

bus! copy

In celebration of the new fixed route transit system that started in my town this Monday, I am posting a link to a re-broadcast of a really wonderful radio program about mass transit: On the Media‘s show, “Whose Streets?”

Naturally cool!

Naturally cool paddle fans

More paddle fans, while it’s still hot!  I’m making these for a new local “Climate Action Coalition.” There’s going to be another layer, of leaf veins and the name of the group and then, I’ll fold them over and glue them with the handle. These are for an event in a few weeks. This tulip poplar leaf block is from a project I never quite finished a few years ago, but it’s perfect for this application–the group is promoting the health of the mountains where I’m living right now and tulip poplars are abundant here, and their leaves are truly unique and aesthetically interesting. I think they’re a good motif for the cause and provide a lot of graphic possibilities. Also, I think it’s a great poster, as is! ha!

Here’s the layer of leaf veins–I think it’ll look cute when it’s folded over and the stick handle suggests a larger vein. I still have to fit the org’s name on here.

print to fabric

These are samples of designs I had printed to fabric last year, both created from prints I did. The one on the left was based on a monotype and the one on the right was based on a reduction cut letterpress print. (I used the blue fabric to cover chair cushions on my chair project last year; I called it “Shop Class.”) I photographed the prints for digital files and then used the fabric printing service, “Spoonflower” to print out yardage. The images above are what the samples looked like when I ordered. (I really like the results, but because I could afford to only get a yard of each, I haven’t found anything to do with the fabric, beyond the cushion cover.)

paddle-fan-a-rama, etc

Hey, here are some things I worked on recently and had some fun with–the paddle fans are to promote bus riding and the poster is a second draft; I plan to amp up its bold color and make the text a little more readable.

 

collagraphic experiences

Here are some of the prints from my time in the shop yesterday. The night before, I had quickly grabbed some cardboard and various papers, carved some designs and glued it all up; my design is all experimentation for practice. I hadn’t done any collagraphs since my BFA education, so it had been about eight years since I’d inked up a plate like this. Yikes, it takes some time and lots of attention to get the desired results. (Also, this shop isn’t really set up for this kind of printing, so I had to do some improvising–it all worked out, though.) I’m not entirely satisfied with the prints, but it started to feel familiar again and I’m going to try again, soon.