my favorite Amendment!

graphic/type design, free speech postcards
letterpress printed postcards

I had a few extra minutes in the printshop yesterday and the type on the bed was for the First Amendment paddle fan I’m working on, so I quickly dug around for a few large letters and some cut-offs from the local university’s copy shop and got to it! It took a bit of time adjusting the spacing, but I find that, just a couple of weeks back in the shop, I’m getting faster and more accurate, comfortably.

Anyway, write on!

back into the ink…

I’ve spent a few hours in the print shop of a local community college and have been, slowly, getting back into the print groove…It’s a very different feel from my woodworking classroom and it’s a real relief to be in a bright, spacious and sawdust-free workspace. It still takes a lot of energy and focus, but the reward is almost immediate and the ink smells like home.

 

printmaking classroom,  press furniture, Challenger letterpresses, Cherokee syllabary type

My last bit of work from my woodworking course…

Handmade, custom-designed desk and drawer. Blue and red and hickory wood.
Here’s Appaloosa and the little blue cube, together, as I intended. (Drawer face on desk still needed…)

Here is the desk set, in its right place. I love it and it works well here. It rolls along the floor well, too, and should be of service all over the house. Nice. This is the last project from my woodworking course. I learned a lot over these two years and, once I catch up on my sleep, I will start looking for a way to continue to make large wooden objects.

‘Appaloosa’

Appaloosa_nearly finished!
The table’s done except for a missing drawer face. The holes are for s-hooks and other hanging tools. The drawer is for pencils, etc, so it’s cool that it’s so shallow. Because of the coloring and how I did the legs, I’m calling it “Appaloosa.”

Here’s my table, just about ready to roll on home!

inflatables

green exercise ball, mdf mold, woodshop

A shot from the woodworking classroom–my classmate was looking for a tight inner mold for his veneer and, after trying some inner tubes, tried this fitness ball, inflated with the air hose. I have no idea where the ball came from–did he just have one around?

bright pink inner tube with cellophane, plywood supportplaster donut

These are images of a similar use of inflatables from a collaborative art effort during grad school (The Happiness Detail). The inner tube was pretty effective, but it took all three of us to manage it at every step…huge and heavy.

Thank you for your work.

Artist/activist Shan Goshorn has died and she will be missed. She was a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and, although her basket work received a lot of attention, she was an accomplished multi-media artist. I admired her work and her way of being an artist on her own terms. 

In her own words from her website, http://www.shangoshorn.net, she says this about her work and her ideals: 

My intention is to present historical and contemporary issues that continue to be relevant to Indian people today, to a world that still relies on Hollywood as a reliable informant about Indian life.

It was a thrilling accident to discover that the vessel shapes of baskets are a non-threatening vehicle to educate audiences.  But even more exciting, I am observing viewers literally leaning into my work, eager to learn more about the history of this country’s First People which can lead to the next wonderful step of engaging in honest dialogue about the issues that still plague Indian people today. America has believed a one-sided history for too long. Acknowledging and addressing these past atrocities is movement towards true racial healing… which has always been the goal of my work as an artist.

Shan Goshorn

July 2016