to catch the summer breeze

new curtain fabric

This image (which is blurry–I’ll replace it soon) is of my new curtain fabric; I dug out an old lino I’d used for a reduction cut handprint, and inked it up. I started by printing this fabric on the press, but it was just too much fabric and I started running out of time, so I just went ahead and printed it by hand (which still took some time, actually) and got adequate-plus results. I’ll run them up by the end of this long weekend, and they’ll be ready to brighten up the bedroom for the new week!

Here is the print that the design came from:

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Surveillance Capitalism

boots upright

A few weeks ago, I posted a blog entry about the internet re-writing my grandfather’s life history (and mine!) and how corrosive that process is to our lives, HERE. Today, on the radio program, Democracy Now, author Shoshana Zuboff discussed this very problem, the subject of her book, The Age of Surveillance Capitalism: The Fight for a Human Future at the New Frontier of Power. She suggests that ‘surveillance capitalists’ are ‘poaching’ our lives to sell the information and that corrupts our agency and our fulfillment as human animals.

I can’t disagree; I’ll be looking for that book.

 

cold frame success!

Here is our tiny winter garden! We’ve been enjoying the arugula for the last couple of weeks. We have been somewhat surprised at this growth after the serious cold and snow we had over the last month or so…But, nature finds a way! And, hardy arugula is our favorite salad green!

Walk On!

old shoes, filled with dirt and growing greens

As noted earlier on this blog, I am interested in transit issues, in particular, city bus routes; I am also very interested in promoting walking, not just as exercise, but as a way to learn one’s community, to get to school/work/stores and to use your one and only animal body! (rarrr!) 

I came across this article, Our Bodies Are Made for Walking, by an Utne reader contributor on its website. I agree and from that article, I found an interesting organization, America Walks, that promotes and helps build healthier communities by helping make them more walkable. This issue will be one I pursue more actively in 2019.

transit talk!

In a coincidence, this week’s “On the Media(radio program from WNYC) is all about public transit and how our lives/living environments are designed by/for car use (and presumed car use), just at the moment I’ve decided to present among my artfolios images from my MFA Thesis show, “Points of Interest,” an installation to promote the bus system in the city where I was attending university. Many of the issues discussed in the OTM segments are issues and ideas I thought about, researched and discussed with my Thesis committee. Although I did not address every one of these issues in my project, I did read, listen and watch a lot of materials about these things. This topic is vital to social and environmental justice and I’m gratified to hear this week’s program.

I am still digging up images, etc, for the POI artfolio page, so it’ll be complete in the next week or two.

 

colors of the fast fading summer

the colors of my  summerAs I prepared to take my clothes off the line this afternoon, it struck me how pretty the colors were and that these were the clothes I’d worn most in my ‘off hours’ this summer (including my pj.s). It’s early October, and it’s still pretty hot (and my neighbors are mowing their lawns, non-stop, STILL!), but autumn is undeniable, so this may be one of the last times these clothes make an appearance on the line this year…

post-storm

We have been unbelievably fortunate up here in the mountains of WNC–we had one day of steady rain during the storm, no real wind and, although the streams and creeks got very high, overall, it was not bad. The heavy rains we’d had a couple of days prior did more damage locally than this storm that is devastating so much of the Carolinas.

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These plants are doing better than ever (and the pollinators are undiminished in number), due to the pre-storm trim. We have been incredibly lucky.

Hurricane Florence in my neighborhood, so far

flowers at the from of the house

I live in  Western North Carolina (Southern Appalachia) in the US, and out here in the mountains, we’re waiting for the storm to slowly arrive…On the coast of NC and inland in the East, there’s horrible destruction that’s not anywhere near over, but out here, the sky is a deep sky blue, the Post Officer just buzzed by in her jeep and a moment ago, I pulled some dry laundry off the line. It’s quiet, but the breeze seems to be building into wind and it’s also a little eerie; I feel a sense of expectation and anxiety in the air.

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Here are the flowers around the house; they’re already a little disheveled from a heavy rain yesterday afternoon, so they’re not looking their best. I’ve decided to heavily trim them so that they won’t be killed by the vagaries of the predicted steady 40mph winds. I am reluctant to do it because these blossoms feed a lot of pollinators every day. However, it’s a small sacrifice and I will be greatly relieved if the self-imposed damage is the worst the neighborhood suffers.

 I will post pictures of the flowers next week, to show how they were affected by the storm.

I wish everyone in the path of this hurricane well (and, good luck to the people in the paths of the storm in the Pacific!).

straw bale gardening

We put a few straw bales up against the house and treated them with fertilizer and watered them the way we read you’re supposed to and here they are as of the end of summer. A few pepper plants really took off and two tomato plants did, too–they’re the plants that fell over the side. Otherwise, the greens and the marigolds just haven’t worked. About a month and a half ago, I found some seeds for 2′ high sunflowers, something I’d never seen before, and thought there was enough summer left to try them; on the right, you can see how well they did! More for the pollinators!